BLU-RAY REVIEW

Call Me By Your Name

Picture4
Sound3
WSR Score3.5
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(Studio/Distributor):
Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
(Catalog Number):
52381
(MPAA Rating):
R
(Rating Reason):
Sexual content, nudity, and some language
(Retail Price):
$30.99
(Disc Type):
Single Side, Dual Layer (BD-50)
(Widescreen Edition):
Yes
(Full Screen Edition):
(Running Time In Minutes):
131
(Color Type):
Color
(Chaptered/Scene Access):
Yes
(Closed Captioned):
Yes
(Regional Coding):
ABC
(Theatrical Year):
(Theatrical Release):
Yes
(Direct-To-Video Release):
No
(Disc Release Date):
5/1/2018
(THX® Digitally Mastered):
(Director):
Lucas Guadagnino
(Screenplay/Written By):
(Story):
(Music):
(Director Of Photography):
(Production Designer):
(Visual Effects):
(Costume Designer):
(Editor):
(Supervising Sound Editors):
(Re-Recording Mixers):
(Executive Producers):
(Co-Producers):
(Producers):
(Academy Awards):
(Principal Photography):
(Theatrical Aspect Ratio):
(Measured Disc Aspect Ratio):
(Disc Soundtrack):
DTS HD Lossless 6.1
(Theatrical Sound):
(Theatrical Re-Issue Soundtrack):
(DTS Bit Rate):
(Dolby Digital Bit Rate):
(Additional Languages):
(French Language):
(Spanish Language):
(Subtitles):

"Call Me By My Name" takes place in the summer of 1983 in Italy. Elio Perlman (Chalamet), a precocious 17-year-old, spends his days in his family's villa transcribing and playing classical music and reading. While Elio's sophistication and intellectual gifts suggest he is already a fully-fledged adult, there is much that yet remains innocent and unformed about him. One day, Oliver (Hammer), a charming American scholar arrives as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Elio's father, an eminent professor. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of the setting, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever. Based on the novel by Andre Aciman. (Gary Reber)

Special features include commentary with Actors Timothée Chalamet & Michael Stuhlbarg, the featurettes "Snapshots Of Italy" (HD 10:45) and "In Conversation With Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg & Luca Guadagnino" (HD 25:10), the music video "Mystery Of Love" by Sufjan Stevens (HD 04:09), the theatrical trailer, upfront previews, and a Movies Anywhere digital copy.

The 1.85:1 1080p AVC picture, reviewed on a Sony Bravia Z9D 4K Ultra HD HDR display, upconverted to 2160p with greater resolution and luminance, was photographed on Kodak Vision3 film stock with the Arricam LT camera system in and sourced from a 2K master Digital Intermediate format. While film grain is an element of the picture quality, it never is distracting. The imagery exhibits a very natural filmic quality with a nicely saturated color palette that is vibrant throughout. Hues are natural in range and complexity. Fleshtones are perfectly natural. Contrast is nicely revealing with natural black levels and revealing shadow delineation. Resolution is excellent and nicely articulates the old Italian architecture, such as old brick and stone walls and stone-paved walkways and streets, and close-ups of natural vegetation and trees, as well as facial and body features, skin textures, hair and clothing. The imagery reaps of a foreign film in visual texture and cinematography and should please fans of film noir. (Gary Reber)

The DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1-channel soundtrack is entirely frontal focused, with some scattered ambient envelopment. Even the music, largely piano, occupies the soundstage but subtly extends to the surrounds at times. Atmospherics are abundant and all manner of insects and birds are prevalent, as well as wind, waves, streams and waterfalls. Sound effects enhance the sense of realism from bicycles and motor scooters to cars and buses, to a train, to a dinner bell, and all manner of din. Dialogue is really forward sounding with extensive ADR casting, The dialogue is mostly English, though, there is quite a bit of Italian and some French, both with subtitles. Overall, the soundtrack is complementary to the storytelling, but mostly monaural in presentation. (Gary Reber)