BLU-RAY REVIEW

Nope 4K Ultra HD

Featured In Issue 263, September/October 2022

Picture4.5
Sound5
Immersive3
WSR Score3
Basic Information on new release titles is posted as soon as titles are announced. Once reviewed, additional data is added to the database.
(Studio/Distributor):
Universal Studios Home Entertainment
(Catalog Number):
1000816017
(MPAA Rating):
R
(Rating Reason):
Language throughout and some violence/bloody images
(Retail Price):
$44.98
(Disc Type):
Single Side, Dual Layer (BD-100)
(Widescreen Edition):
Yes
(Full Screen Edition):
(Running Time In Minutes):
130
(Color Type):
Color
(Chaptered/Scene Access):
Yes
(Closed Captioned):
Yes
(Regional Coding):
ABC
(Theatrical Year):
(Theatrical Release):
Yes
(Direct-To-Video Release):
No
(Disc Release Date):
10/25/2022
(THX® Digitally Mastered):
(Director):
Jordan Peele
(Screenplay/Written By):
(Story):
(Music):
(Director Of Photography):
(Production Designer):
(Visual Effects):
(Costume Designer):
(Editor):
(Supervising Sound Editors):
(Re-Recording Mixers):
(Executive Producers):
(Co-Producers):
(Producers):
(Academy Awards):
(Principal Photography):
(Theatrical Aspect Ratio):
(Measured Disc Aspect Ratio):
(Disc Soundtrack):
Dolby Atmos, Dolby TrueHD 7.1
(Theatrical Sound):
(Theatrical Re-Issue Soundtrack):
(DTS Bit Rate):
(Dolby Digital Bit Rate):
(Additional Languages):
(Subtitles):

The science fiction thriller Nope follows a father's shocking death. Hollywood animal wrangler OJ (Daniel Kaluuya) and his sister Emerald (Keke Palmer) begin observing unexplained phenomena on their vast Southern California ranch that leads them down an obsessive rabbit hole as they plot attempts to capture the mystery on camera. Along with a former child star turned family theme park ringmaster (Steven Yeun) who neighbors the siblings, the pair's efforts to chase the spectacle soon bring terrifying consequences and unimaginable horror. The result is a complex social thriller that unpacks the seeds of violence, risk and opportunism that are inseparable from the romanticized history of the Smerican West... and show business itself. (Gary Reber)

Special features include the featurettes "Shadows: The Making Of Nope" (HD 56:05), "Call Him Jean Jackett" (HD 14;22) and "Mystery Man of Muybridge" (HD 05:30), five deleted scenes (HD 09:25), gag reel (HD 05:29) and a Movies Anywhere digital copy.

The 1.20:1/1.78:1 2160p HEVC/H.265 Ultra HD HDR10 picture, reviewed on a Sony Bravia Z9D 4K Ultra HD HDR display, was photographed digitally and filmed for IMAX and on 65 mm Kodak Vision 3 film stock in Panavision Super 70 using the Arri Alexa 65 Infrared, IMAX MKIV, IMAX MSM 9802, Panavision 65 HR, Panavision Panaflex Gold, Panavision Panaflex Platinum and Panavision Panaflex System 65 Studio camera systems and sourced from a 4K master Digital Intermediate format. The picture exhibits naturalness throughout. HDR contrast is superb with lots of night and shadowy scenes that are revealing and haunting. Black levels are deep but natural with excellent shadow delineation. White levels are perfectly natural, without exaggeration. Color fidelity is excellent with nicely saturated hues that exhibit vividness and color depth. Flesh tones are natural. Nuanced hue shadings enhance the realism of the scenes. Resolution and image sharpness are excellent throughout. This is a very fine Ultra HD visual experience. (Gary Reber)

The Dolby Atmos/Dolby TrueHD 7.1-channel soundtrack features an orchestral and folkish score that is haunting and enhances the mysteriousness. The music fills the soundstage with a wide and deep soundstage that extends a aggressively to the surrounds. Dialogue sounds perfectly natural and generally has good spatial integration except for segments of ADR. Atmospherics sound realistic and enhance the sense of the unknown. Sound effects intensify as the movie progresses with powerful sub-25 Hz bass associated with an alien life force. There is panned thunderous and crackling sounds an pouring rain that engulfs the soundfield with dimensionality. Surround energy is intense.

The Immersive Sound element is comprised of very little and includes spotty atmospheric din, wind, sky borne alien sound effects, screaming voices, weird inside alien sound effects, flying saucer sound effects, some music, screaming sounds, rain, and other effects. The ending scenes become far more intense with the element louder. So many of the scenes lent themselves to an aggressive height layer application, but were ignored.

This is well produced holosonicŪ spherical surround soundtrack that envelops the soundfield. (Gary Reber)