BLU-RAY REVIEW

History Of The World In Two Hours 3D

Featured In Issue 168, July/August 2012

3D Picture4
Picture4
Sound4
WSR Score5
Basic Information on new release titles is posted as soon as titles are announced. Once reviewed, additional data is added to the database.
(Studio/Distributor):
A&E Home Video
(Catalog Number):
261850
(MPAA Rating):
Not Rated
(Rating Reason):
(Retail Price):
$29.95
(Disc Type):
Single Side, Single Layer (BD-25)
(Widescreen Edition):
Yes
(Full Screen Edition):
No
(Running Time In Minutes):
88
(Color Type):
Color
(Chaptered/Scene Access):
Yes
(Closed Captioned):
Yes
(Regional Coding):
Not Indicated
(Theatrical Year):
2011
(Theatrical Release):
No
(Direct-To-Video Release):
Yes
(Disc Release Date):
05/15/12
(THX® Digitally Mastered):
No
(Director):
Douglas J. Cohen
(Screenplay/Written By):
(Story):
(Music):
(Director Of Photography):
(Production Designer):
(Visual Effects):
(Costume Designer):
(Editor):
(Supervising Sound Editors):
(Re-Recording Mixers):
(Executive Producers):
(Co-Producers):
(Producers):
(Academy Awards):
(Principal Photography):
(Theatrical Aspect Ratio):
(Measured Disc Aspect Ratio):
(Disc Soundtrack):
Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS HD Lossless 5.1
(Theatrical Sound):
(Theatrical Re-Issue Soundtrack):
(DTS Bit Rate):
(Dolby Digital Bit Rate):
(Additional Languages):
(French Language):
(Spanish Language):
(Chinese Language):
(Subtitles):
(Cantonese Language):
(Mandarin Language):
(Japanese Language):
(Italian Language):
(German Language):
(Portuguese Language):

History Of The World In Two Hours is a landmark History Channel television special that cuts 13.7 billion years of history down to 88 minutes (sans commercials). The documentary traces the whole story about where we came from and how we got here. From the formation of the earth and the emergence of life, to the advance of man and the growth of civilization, the CGI-driven special reveals surprising connections to our daily lives. Find out why your original ancestor is an exploding star, how your handheld device hides a Stone Age secret, and why your fat-paced modern lifestyle grew from seeds planted more than 10,000 years ago. (Gary Reber)

There are no special features.

The 1080p MVC 3D picture is definitely more intriguing and engaging in its 3D presentation, even though the archival source material is inconsistent in depth quality that extends to the interviews as well. But overall, this is an effective visual experience that always enlightens and stimulates thinking. The visual parameters are faulted to the degree that the source material is. Thus, while colors can be nicely saturated, contrast well balanced, and black level well defined, these qualities can show some degradation at times. Resolution varies as well, with some segments exhibiting superb detail while others appear softly focused. But overall, this is a presentation that will mesmerize the entire family and deliver a sweeping understanding of the creation and evolution of the world we inhabit. The 3D presentation is a must-see recommendation, as its compelling message is that mankind will continue, as from our first presence on earth, invent and innovate with non-human tools used to produce our lifestyles! (Gary Reber)

The DTS-HD Master Audioô 5.1-channel soundtrack is nicely complementary to the storytelling with effective atmospherics, sound effects, and an active orchestral music score, all providing a sense of soundfield envelopment. No particular element is exaggerated, but as a documentary production this sound is overall engaging. Corey Burton's narration is always intelligible and balanced against the sonic background. The soundtrack does a generally good job at supporting this stimulating storytelling. (Gary Reber)