WSR Detailed LaserDisc Review

Just The Ticket
Genre:Romantic Comedy

Reviewed In Issue 33 Of Widescreen Review® Stars:
Andy Garcia,Andie MacDowell & Richard Bradford

WSR Review Scores
Picture Rating: 3.5
Sound Rating: 3.5
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Reference Systems
Critics' Composite Score:
Internet Links

Supplementals
None

DVD General Information
(Studio/Distributor): MGM Home Entertainment
(Catalog Number): ML107302
(MPAA Rating): R
(Retail Price): $29.98
(Running Time In Minutes): 114
(Color Type): Color
(Chaptered/Scene Access): Yes
(Closed Captioned): Yes
(Theatrical Release): 1998
(LD Release Date): 06/99
(THX® Digitally Mastered): No

Credits Information
(Director): Richard Wenk
(Screenplay/Written By): Richard Wenk
(Story): NA
(Music): Rick Marotta
(Director Of Photography):
(Production Designer): Franckie Diago
(Visual Effects):
(Costume Designer):
(Editor): Christopher Cibelli
(Supervising Sound Editors):
(Re-Recording Mixers):
(Executive Producers): Andie MacDowell & Yoram Pelman
(Co-Producers): John H. Starke
(Producers): Gary Lucchesi & Andy Garcia

DVD Picture Information
(Principal Photography): Academy Standard Flat
(Theatrical Aspect Ratio): 1.85:1
(Measured LaserDisc Aspect Ratio): 1.82:1

DVD Sound Information
(DVD Soundtrack): Dolby Digital Surround
(Theatrical Sound): DTS Digital
(Theatrical Re-Issue Soundtrack):
(Remastered Dolby Digital): No
(Remastered DTS Digital Surround): No
(Additional Languages):

WSR Narrative Review
Story Synopsis:
Just The Ticket is a charming romantic comedy that stars Andy Garcia as a lovable loser who is one of the sharpest ticket scalpers in New York City. Heís madly in love with chef-to-be Andie MacDowell who has recently kicked him to the curb citing his lack of responsibility. But the trouble is, they are both still in love. Boxing great Joe Frazier makes a cameo appearance

LaserDisc Picture:
Color balance is nicely rendered with accurate fleshtones, rich and vibrant colors and deep, pure blacks. Sometimes the picture appears slightly oversaturated and wanting in clarity. Images are sharp and detailed, though fine details are wanting throughout. Shadow delineation and contrast are nicely rendered, as is the entire visual experience that is sometimes wanting in natural openness. Minor noise is apparent on the 1.82:1 LaserDisc.

LaserDisc Soundtrack:
The discrete 5.1 Dolby Digital audio sounds awfully manufactured with dialogue that is closely miked and ADR-processed with a forward presence that is wanting in spatial integration. The matrix PCM soundtrack sounds slightly more open with at times greater surround presence. Surround is generally aggressive, but split surround dimensionality is virtually non-existent. The music score is often swinging and nicely recorded with excellent bass definition, especially on the discrete version, which is further enhanced with natural sounding .1 LFE.
(Surround Bass Below 50Hz): No
(Aggressive System Surround): Yes
(Intense 25Hz Bass): No
(Deep Bass Challenging): No
(Aggressive 0.1 LFE):
(Holosonic Soundfield): No
(Aggressive Split Surround): No
(Center Back Surround Imaging): No
(Directionalized Dialogue): No
Superb Sound Effects Recording Quality:
Superb Music Score Recording Quality:
Superb Special Visual Effects Quality:
Superb Color Fidelity:
Superb Cinematography:
Reference LaserDisc:
No
Collector Edition:
No
DVD To LaserDisc Comparison:
The anamorphically enhanced DVD, viewed in component video, exhibits a solid picture without distracting noise or artifacts. Color balance is nicely rendered with accurate fleshtones, rich and vibrant colors and deep, pure blacks. By comparison, the LaserDisc is slightly oversaturated and lacking the clarity of the DVD. Images are sharp and detailed, with good vertical and horizontal resolution for clarity and definition, while the LaserDisc lacks the minute detail of the DVD. Shadow delineation and contrast are nicely rendered on both versions, as is the entire visual experience that is sometimes wanting in natural openness. Minor noise is apparent on the LaserDisc. The LaserDisc, and anamorphic and letterbox DVD measure 1.82:1. The discrete 5.1 Dolby Digital LaserDisc and DVD soundtracks sound awfully manufactured with dialogue that is closely miked and ADR-processed with a forward presence that is wanting in spatial integration. The LaserDiscís matrix PCM soundtrack sounds slightly more open with at times greater surround presence. Surround is generally aggressive, but split surround dimensionality is virtually non-existent. The music score is often swinging and nicely recorded with excellent bass definition, especially on the discrete version, which is further enhanced with natural sounding .1 LFE.