WSR Detailed LaserDisc Review

Siege, The
Genre:Action Adventure

Reviewed In Issue 33 Of Widescreen Review® Stars:
Denzel Washington, Annette Bening & Bruce Willis

WSR Review Scores
Picture Rating: 4
Sound Rating: 5
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Reference Systems
Critics' Composite Score:
Internet Links

Supplementals
None

DVD General Information
(Studio/Distributor): 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
(Catalog Number): 0017385
(MPAA Rating): R
(Retail Price): $39.98
(Running Time In Minutes): 116
(Color Type): Color
(Chaptered/Scene Access): Yes
(Closed Captioned): Yes
(Theatrical Release): 1998
(LD Release Date): 05/99
(THX® Digitally Mastered): No

Credits Information
(Director): Edward Zwick
(Screenplay/Written By): Lawrence Wright, Menno Meyjes & Edward Zwick
(Story): Lawrence Wright
(Music): Graeme Revell
(Director Of Photography):
(Production Designer): Lilly Kilvert
(Visual Effects):
(Costume Designer):
(Editor): Steven Rosenblum
(Supervising Sound Editors):
(Re-Recording Mixers):
(Executive Producers): Peter Schindler
(Co-Producers): NA
(Producers): Lynda Obst & Edward Zwick

DVD Picture Information
(Principal Photography): Super 35
(Theatrical Aspect Ratio): 2.40:1
(Measured LaserDisc Aspect Ratio): 2.32:1

DVD Sound Information
(DVD Soundtrack): Dolby Digital Surround
(Theatrical Sound): DTS, SDDS & Dolby Digital
(Theatrical Re-Issue Soundtrack):
(Remastered Dolby Digital): No
(Remastered DTS Digital Surround): No
(Additional Languages):

WSR Narrative Review
Story Synopsis:
New York City is once again under attack in The Siege and itís up to FBI agent Anthony Hubbard (Washington), NSA agent Elise Kraft (Bening) and Army General William Devereaux (Willis) to put a stop to the terrorism. The three react to the anarchy that is developing around them with conflicting responses, but they are attempting to find those responsible for the destruction before itís too late. Lots of explosions.

LaserDisc Picture:
The LaserDisc, framed at 2.32:1, exhibits a stylized picture with a cold stark appearance that is beautifully contrasted with deep pure blacks against cold bluish whites. Otherwise, colors are naturally rendered, with accurate fleshtones and rich hues. The picture is sharp and detailed, though sometimes images appear plugged-up and wanting in natural openness, with interior colors slightly smeared. Minor noise is apparent throughout the LaserDisc, but there are no distracting artifacts.

LaserDisc Soundtrack:
The Dolby Digital discrete 5.1 and matrix PCM soundtracks are terrific with at times thrilling holosonic soundfield dimension. Surround delineation on the Dolby Digital version is often very discrete and aggressive sounding for effective directionalized envelopment. The matrix PCM delivers a fine surround presentation as well, often with a more engaging envelopment presence. Bass extension is deep and powerful with effects that drive response to below 25Hz and further enhanced with discrete .1 LFE. The Army engagement scene is explosive and system threatening. Dialogue is nicely integrated spatially, and the expansive music wraps well into the surrounds.
(Surround Bass Below 50Hz): Yes
(Aggressive System Surround): Yes
(Intense 25Hz Bass): Yes
(Deep Bass Challenging): Yes
(Aggressive 0.1 LFE):
(Holosonic Soundfield): Yes
(Aggressive Split Surround): Yes
(Center Back Surround Imaging): No
(Directionalized Dialogue): No
Superb Sound Effects Recording Quality:
Superb Music Score Recording Quality:
Superb Special Visual Effects Quality:
Superb Color Fidelity:
Superb Cinematography:
Reference LaserDisc:
No
Collector Edition:
No
DVD To LaserDisc Comparison:
The LaserDisc and non-anamorphic DVD are similar in appearance, and are both framed at 2.32:1, but the DVD is superior in clarity and color balance. The picture is often stylized with a cold stark appearance that is beautifully contrasted with deep pure blacks against cold bluish whites. Otherwise, colors are naturally rendered, with accurate fleshtones and rich hues. The LaserDisc picture sometimes appears plugged-up and wanting in natural openness, with interior colors slightly smeared. Images are sharp and detailed on both versions, but by direct comparison, the LaserDisc is wanting in finer detail and definition. Minor noise is apparent throughout the LaserDisc, while digital compression artifacts are apparent on the DVD, but neither format reveals distracting artifacts. The Dolby Digital discrete 5.1 DVD and LaserDisc soundtrack and the LaserDiscís matrix PCM soundtracks are terrific with at times thrilling holosonic soundfield dimension. Surround delineation on the Dolby Digital version is often very discrete and aggressive sounding for effective directionalized envelopment. The matrix PCM delivers a fine surround presentation as well, often with a more engaging envelopment presence. Bass extension is deep and powerful with effects that drive response to below 25Hz and further enhanced with discrete .1 LFE. The Army engagement scene is explosive and system threatening. Dialogue is nicely integrated spatially, and the expansive music wraps well into the surrounds.